Posts Tagged ‘Scrimshaw’

French and Indian Style Horn by Carl Dumke,

September 15, 2014

Carl Dumke just finished a large F&I horn that he was commission to produce. Carl is doing business under the name of Grinning Fox Studios.   Many of Carl’s horns are on his Facebook page.

This horn has the name of the owner in the style of John Bush with some chip carving between the lines of text.

French and Indian Horn  by Carl Dumke

French and Indian Horn by Carl Dumke

This is what Carl wrote: The owner is from Maryland, so I included the original name of the state as Queen Mary’s Land. I also included a few florals to represent the stylized state flower (Black-Eyed Susan).

Queen's Land

Queen’s Land

The spout is carved to represent a tulip flower and flares to a finely-detailed engrailed shoulder.

The spout is carved to represent a tulip flower.

The spout is carved to represent a tulip flower.

On the reverse is a map of the Allegheny Valley with various forts depicted on the map of Braddock’s Road I found in an old book.

The forts

The forts

The plug is made from a piece of tiger maple–you can just see the stripes and it has a turned antler finial. The plug is attached to the body with 5 square steel pins I forged in the shop.

Base Plug

Base Plug of tiger maple and turned antler

The whole horn is just over 19″ long and has been slightly aged. This black, red, and white woven horn strap from my friend Kris Polizzi to finish off the whole look of the horn to give it an authentic 1750s feel.

Finished Horn with strap.

Finished Horn with strap.

Cheyenne Ledger Book Powder Horn by Kevin Hart

June 11, 2013

Kevin Hart of Hillsboro Oregon bought this horn from me on eBay last month. He sent me pictures and details on how he made the horn:

“I completed the smaller horn, and figured you might wish to have a look.

Large Cow horn that was listed on eBay

Large Cow horn that was listed on eBay

“Initially I was concerned that the horn might not work.  It had a lot of dark area’s throughout the body but I decided to give it a go and the horn worked perfectly.

Horn after sanding.

Horn after sanding.

Horn before staining.  It looks great just like it is.

Horn just about done, ready for staining. Sometimes I think about not staining a horn because at times they look so good in the white.

This powderhorn is titled, “Cheyenne Ledger Book Horn”.  It depicts a horn made by either a Cheyenne warrior or a trapper of the period who camped around Bent’s Fort or worked at the fort in South-Eastern Colorado around 1837.

CHEYENE LEDGER BOOK HORN by Kevin Hart Done and ready for shining times Top View

CHEYENNE LEDGER BOOK HORN by Kevin Hart
Done and ready for shining times Top View

The Scrimshaw art on it reflects the style found in many period Cheyenne ledger books.

Inside curve of the finished Horn by Kevin Hart

Inside curve of the finished Horn by Kevin Hart

Left side view. This Cheyenne Indian is celebrating another horse stealing raid as a seasoned warrior as depicted by the length of his head dress.

Left side view.
This Cheyenne Indian is celebrating another horse stealing raid as a seasoned warrior as depicted by the length of his head-dress.

I have a great fondness for Ledger Book Art.  Bent’s Fort was a fur trading post on the mountain branch of the Santa Fe Trail where traders, trappers, travelers, and the Cheyenne & Arapaho tribes came together in peaceful terms for trade. A wonderful place to see and explore.

Verse found on horns of the F & I, and Revolutionary war periods.  I took artistic license and used it on a 1837 horn. "Importance of dry powder still applied. Yes, it is so."

Verse found on horns of the F & I, and Revolutionary war periods. I took artistic license and used it on a 1837 horn.
“Importance of dry powder still applied.
Yes, it is so.”

This horn is about 16” long from tip to the back finial.

It features an aged medium yellow body, black throat & high distressed black turned pine base plug.

Banner cartouche showing where horn was made/year and room for owner’s name

Banner cartouche showing where horn was made/year and room for owner’s name

Scene shows Bent’s Fort as it looked from 1833 into the early 1840s.  Many tribes set up their lodges around the fort during trading season .

Also shown is an Indian on a Buffalo hunt, where they would run the Buffalo and bring their horse dangerously close to the animal they were hunting.

My Maker’s mark, where it usually sits these days on the back/bottom of the horn.

Bent’s Fort. Indian on a Buffalo hunt,  My Maker’s mark, where it usually sits these days on the back/bottom of the horn.

Bent’s Fort. Indian on a Buffalo hunt,
My Maker’s mark, where it usually sits these days on the back/bottom of the horn.

The finial is a turned antler horn that’s been highly aged, and the tip is also turned antler horn that I’ve stained and aged as well.

Detail look at the aged antler horn spout & tip.

Detail look at the aged antler horn spout & tip.

The base plug is held in place with brass pins/tacks that have also been aged and the tip is held in place using small thin pins.

Detail look at the aged butt plug and antler horn finial.

Detail look at the aged base plug and antler horn finial.

It features a high degree of engrailing design and scrimshawed art.

The horn can be worn either left or right, but is truly a left side horn.

For more information on this horn an others, contact Kevin Hart, harts.athome@frontier.com

West Coast Horn Fair 2013 Raffle Prizes

March 12, 2013

The West Coast Horn fair will be held in Littlerock WA April 26, 27 and 28 2013. The event is funded entirely by raffle tickets.  Horn makers from all over the US have donated prizes for this raffle.

You do not need to be present to win. We mail the prizes to you at no cost to you. For a complete list of all the prizes and a link to buy tickets click HERE

Southern Banded Horn by Scott Sibley

Southern Banded Horn by Scott Sibley

This Southern Banded Powder Horn was donated by Scott Sibley.  The horn measures 13″ around the double curve.  Scott filed the horn to make it much lighter in weight. The tip is turned Whitetail antler and it done in two pieces as were the majority of original horns. The tip and bands are fastened with wooden pegs.

Applied Tip on Sibley's Horn

Applied Tip on Sibley’s Horn

There are four turned bands. The base plug is cherry, turned with a “wasp waist” design as per an original “Shenandoah Valley” horn that is in Scott’s collection.  The dark color is also like the original horn.

Wampum beaded Belt “Hawkeye Belt”donated by Gary Bertelsen

Wampum belt patterned after the movie The Last of the Mohicans. By Gary Bertelsen

Wampum belt patterned after the movie The Last of the Mohicans. By Gary Bertelsen

This is designed after the belt Daniel Day Lewis used as a horn belt in the
movie “Last of the Mohicans” also known at the “Hawkeye Belt”

It is made with replica wampum beads, woven on brain tanned deer hide
laces with artificial sinew.

Measures (beaded portion) 50 inches plus 15 inches of lace fringe on each
end – At 50 inches, this is a strap that will fit a Big Boy. gbertels@insight.rr.com

“Osceola” beaded garters.

Second prize by Gary Bertelsen (no picture yet)I included a set of “Osceola” beaded garters.   These are based on the original piece at the National Museum of the American Indian which says they were actually worn by Osceola and included in a George Catlin painting. gbertels@insight.rr.com

Horn Box donated by Tim Sanner

Horn Box donated by Tim Sanner

Horn Box donated by Tim Sanner

Tim Sanner is a Journeyman Horner in the Honourable Company of Horners.  This little container is called a Horn Box. The box is made of cow horn with a walnut base.  The lid is turned walnut with a white horn ring.  It measures 3 1/2″ tall and 2 1/2″ in diameter. This is a piece anyone would be proud to own.

13 WCHF Yosef

Artist Proof on cow horn by Yosef Trilling

13 WCHF Yosef (640x480)

Artist Proof on cow horn by Yosef Trilling

Two artist’s proof horns engraved by Yosef Trilling. He takes a cow horn and engraves a new subject to see exactly how it will look on the curved and limited surface of the horn. Yosef can be found on eBay and the CLA site. Also atrilling@kc.rr.com.

Engraving tool made and donated by David Rase.

Engraving tool made and donanted by David Rase.

Engraving tool made and donated by David Rase.

Engraving Tool by David Rase

This tool can be used to do some fine engraving on a powder horn. The tip is a Coulter Precision carbide point held in place with a set screw so the tip can be changed out when it gets dull.  Dave hand turned the brass holder and installed a blue grip cushion.  You can reach David  at davidrase@q.com

THE HARTLEY HORN DRAWINGS

This hard back book was donated by Jeff Bibb at The Honourable Company of Horners.

Robert M. Hartley made these drawings documenting historic powder horns. The  drawings are laid out so you see all sides of the horn. There are close-up photos of  the Royal Coat of Arms, rivers, cities and towns, forts and animals.

The Hartley Horn Drawings donated by The Honourable Company of Horners

The Hartley Horn Drawings donated by The Honourable Company of Horners

Detail from the pages of The Hartley Book
Detail from the pages of The Hartley Book

Detail from the pages of The Hartley Book

Detail from the pages of The Hartley Book

Semi-Reproduction of “The Buckskinner” Tansel Horn by Larry Gotkin

February 7, 2013

This is a picture of an original Tansel horn that was auctioned at Cowan’s auctions in Cincinnati, Ohio.

"Image courtesy of Cowan's Auctions, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio."

Original Tansel Horn “Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio.”

Larry Gotkin Horn with Eagle and serpent.

Larry Gotkin Horn with Eagle and serpent.

 

Larry Gotkin only had pictures of this horn and was able to create a semi-reproduction that was very pleasing to his  client.  The client realized that creating a copy was impossible.

Finding a good horn was difficult.  Powder Horns and More supplied the horn.  The shape is not perfect but Larry felt style of the horn was very good.

The original horn is 16″ length. It is engraved with the Eagle clutching arrows and sheaths of wheat, E. Pluribus Unum in a banner above the eagle, a hunter (i.e. the “Buckskinner”) hunting deer.

It has a nice serpent’s mouth (fish mouth) with the teeth carved protruding on to the spout. This particular horn has been nicknamed the “Buckskinner’s powder horn.”

It is interesting because it has a screw top, wood base with iron loop and another iron loop near the spout.

One large brass tack has been in the base of the horn for a long time, it has a beautiful dark brown halo around it.

View of the Original's throat and tip. "Image courtesy of Cowan's Auctions, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio."

View of the Original’s throat and tip. “Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio.”

Tansel 02

Larry Gotkin Horn with E. Pluribus Unum in a banner above the eagle,

"Image courtesy of Cowan's Auctions, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio."

“Image courtesy of Cowan’s Auctions, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio.”

There is a fringed-shirted hunter carrying a flintlock and a striped hound.

Larry Gotkin's interpretation of the original horn.

Larry Gotkin’s interpretation of the original horn.

Tansel 01 Tansel 03 Tansel 04

Tansel 08

It took a lot of work, and several re-scrapings before Larry got “into” the drawing style.  The original is dated 1790 just below the eagle’s tail, which he included as well, but Larry also signed and  dated his logo.

This is a great example of contemporary workmanship done in the style of an original horn.

http://www.larrygotkin.com

PowderHorns and More supplied the cow horn that was a similar size and shape.

PowderHorns and More supplied the cow horn that was a similar size and shape. The beginning of a masterpiece with only four pictures to go by.

Detail of the screw tip on the horn.

Detail of the screw tip on the horn.

tan18

First attempt at the Eagle

tan20

Another attempt at the Eagle

Tansel 07

The finished Eagle with stain.

Wife Horn by Cory Joe Stewart

January 28, 2013
We have known Cory Joe Stewart since we started Powder Horns and More in 2006.  He was working on his PHD in Early American History and doing powder horns as a hobby. Now he is working in education in North Carolina
This is one of Cory’s early horns. He found this old saying about what you should do concerning your wife and your powder horn.
This horn has a small dome base with a staple. The scallops at the tip add a nice touch. The throat has some nice engrailing.
Old saying about not sharing your wife or your horn by Cory Joe Stewart

Old saying about not sharing your wife or your horn by Cory Joe Stewart

Take not this horn
for fare or shame
for on it lies the owners name
My horn my wife I
Do intend to use
But not to lend if that
should cause strife
I would lend me horn
before me wife
Cory Joe Stewart coryjoes@gmail.com

Horn for Fellow Vet by Jason Jacobs

January 18, 2013

Jason Jacobs writes:

I used one of your horns to make this finished horn for my cousin, Terry.

Terry was with the 502nd BN, 101st Airborne Division in Vietnam. He had a
very difficult time after he got home and he did not really open up to anyone
until after I was deployed overseas and came home myself.

Campaign Horn by Jason Jacobs

Campaign Horn by Jason Jacobs

The centerpiece of the design (the Eagle) was inspired by one of Mike

Robert’s horns seen on your Customer Creations page. I added the “502” to the shield and the banner above the eagle reads “Rendezvous With Destiny”, the battle cry of the 101st.

Horn by Jason Jacobs for his cousin Terry Smith

The plug and stopper are walnut and I finger-wove the strap from buckskin.

Horn by Jason Jacobs cjacobs@tipmont.net

Wabash Valley Works is a veteran owned and operated business specializing in the manufacturing of fine, reproduction 18th Century weapons and accouterments.

Wild Willy Frankfort on the cover of The Horn Book

June 13, 2012

This is the cover of The Horn Book (winter 2012), the magazine of The Honorable Company of Horners.  It is an original painting by Willie Frankfort of himself sitting at a table with horn items around him.

The sign reads, “Horn Shop at Ye Gaston Town. Makers Powder horns ~ Cups ~ Spoons ~ and Snuffboxes.

At the bottom, it says: ” The Master Craftsman

A Canvas sits alone and bare awaiting a touch so tender with care

Strokes applied with care and delight, images forming an incredible sight,

A splendid design of flowers and vines of birds with feathers appearing to shine,

If you look in the center you will see the master craftsman looking at thee. “

Anonymous

Willy Frankfort tells me that this painting although nice, it’s not his favorite style.  He is an illustrator and a cartoonist and likes the folksy sketches from the 17th and 18th century.  He likes to mingle his style with that of past artists and I think it  came out really nice.

Willie writes in his biography.

Wiilliam “Wild Willy” Frankfort

Hello, I am Wm. “Wild Willy” Frankfort artist and professional Horner.

I am a registered Master Horner with the Honorable Company of Horners.  A Guild started in 1996 to assist and instruct artists and craftsmen in the endeavor of creating powder horns and other horn items.  (Cups, spoons, combs, etc.)  I became a Master in 2006 and have accumulated numerous awards for my craft.  I am a founding member of, “Rangers of the Ohio Company” and currently a member of, “The First Virginia Regiment” Experimental Archeologist, and Re-Enactors.  My passion is 18th century frontier history, particularly the Virginia backcountry.

I am currently teaching at Pricketts Fort, West Virginia in the, “Teaching History Through the Arts” program and have been an instructor with the National Parks Service and many private and local programs for the last twenty odd years.

I was looking on Wild Willy’s website and the Jamestown Horn caught my eye. It is a late 17th century style flat “partitioned” horn.  It is about 13″ long and has three panels on both sides.

The first panel is a map of the Roanok area with shipwreks, islands, and natives.  It is taken from one of the original Jamestown maps.

The next panel is of the compass rose of the of the original map, and the last is a ship from the map.

The top band states, “The pictures of sundry things from the voyage made by Sir Walter Raleigh Knight 1585.”

A WERON (Warrior)

The reverse side offers three panels of the natives from that area.

A Cheiff Lorde

The horn is covered in geometrics and has one applied ring and spout.  For more information contact William Frankfort, wildwilly1747@verizon.net, or if he is out of town, his son Zachary, zfrankfort1911@stu.aii.edu

Scott Morrison Featured Artist

January 7, 2012

Scott is a good friend and has been a great help in getting the first annual West Coast Horn Fair up and running.  I deeply appreciate all the help Scott unselfishly gave to make it the success it was.  Here is a little about this talented horner.  The rest of his story can be found on our website.

Scott Morrison of the Willamette Valley Oregon

I (Scott Morrison) am 55 years old and live in the mid Willamette Valley of Western Oregon.

I’m a relative newcomer to the sport of black powder shooting, having started in 2006 when I purchased a Lyman Great Plains rifle kit to assemble. My “first” horn was one I assembled from a kit, which was basically installing the mahogany base plug and securing it with brass pins. I did customize the horn, carefully filing four flats on the tip, afraid the whole time that I would break through. In May, 2007, I took a one day workshop on making French and Indian War period powder horns, taught by California horner Steve Vance. This one day class was a turning point in my life as I fell in love with making powder horns. My first horns were made for my two children to use when at our black powder club. Once you’ve made one though you cannot stop and I started making horns for family and friends, trying different techniques and improving my art.

What I enjoy most about working with horn is discovering and bringing forth the shape that is hidden within. I like to tell people that a horn will let me know what it wants to be and my job is to make that happen. Sometimes I’m successful and achieve what I strive for, bringing out the beauty in a horn.

Northwest Coastal Indian theme

One of the most inspired horns I have done was for a customer in Alaska. He wanted the horn to be a Chinook salmon, and after some discussion we settled on a Northwest Coastal Indian theme. I used a rather extremely oval horn with a lot of curve and fitted it with a cherry base plug. No attempt was made to round the horn and the oval cross-section was kept. The base plug was carved into the head of a fish with Inuit design. Native designs also were engraved on the horn body and the spout plug was a fish tail, also carved from cherry. In 2009 I took the horn to Dixon’s Muzzleloading Fair in Pennsylvania, entering it into competition. The horn was quite a sensation at the fair and it came away with three ribbons.

I continue to improve my craft and explore new ways and styles with my focus currently being the Southern banded horns of Virginia and North Carolina. I don’t like to recreate any particular original horn, but instead take inspiration from a variety of originals to incorporate into my design. I look for the unusual, some aspect of a horn that one doesn’t normally find, yet still retains the character of the style.

An example is an engraved North Carolina banded horn I recently completed. Engraving is not something normally found on the banded Southern horns, yet the 1803 original was engraved with a floral design. I replicated that engraving on my horn along with a scallop design from another Southern horn.

I am a member of the Honourable Company of Horners, having joined after finding an application to the guild in an order of horns I received from John and Linda. At Dixon’s, in 2009 and again in 2010, I spent most of my time there at the HCH table, meeting a lot of new and old friends.

I’m also a member of the Horner’s Bench, an internet forum dedicated specifically to horn work. This is one of (if not the) best online forums available. The members all share a unity of purpose: to freely promote working with horn and sharing their knowledge. It definitely is a worthwhile forum to be a part of.

Most of the horn pictures featured here are all custom horns made for someone. Scott sometimes has both the plainer and a few fancier engraved horns available for sale!

Contact Scott at smorrisonhorns@gmail.com

And the winners are:

May 4, 2011
Everyone of the participants are the real winners. All the people who supported the event with prizes and buying raffle tickets are winners in our book. The teachers of the many classes felt like winners when the faces of the attendees light up as they absorb all the new ideas.
Here is a list of the donors and the names of the winners!Subscription of Muzzleloader Magazine  Won by Scott Morrison, participant
Powder Horn strap by Lynn Blevens won by David Resler

Skillman Strap

Weaving Welchman Strap

Powder Horn strap by Lynn Blevens red, white and blue won by Paul Butcher.
Powder Horn strap by Pam Skillman won by Don Kerr, participant
Powder Horn strap by Kris Pelizzi won by Scott Morrison, participant

Glenn Sutt Knife

Leather hide donated by James Eastman won by Bob Kopner
Knife by Glenn Sutt won by Don Opalewski
Horn Oven by David Rase won by Scott Morrison, participant
Leather Bag by Jim Smith won by Don Kerr, participant

Artist’s Proof on horn by Yosef won by Chip Kormas, participant
Horn Measure by Roger Hodge won by George Hey

Primer by Jerry Frank

Priming Flask by Jerry Frank won by Chris Miller, participant
Priming Horn by Chip Kormas won by Ron Smith

Primer by Steve Lodding

Priming Horn by Steve Lodding won by Steve Skillman, participant

Banded Horn by Scott Morrison won by Jim

Scott Morrison Banded Horn

Smith, participant

Banded horn by Steve Skillman

Banded Horn by Steve Skillman donated by Dave Rase won by Ron Smith, participant
Engraved Powder Horn by Rich Froehlich

Engraved Powder Horn by Rick Froehlich

won by Bo Brown, participant

Joint horn by John Shorb and Don Opalowski

Engraved Horn by Don Opalewski made by John Shorb won by Jim Smith, participant

Tinder Box by Willy Frankfort won by Don Opalewski

Tinder Box by Willy Frankfort

David Wright Print donated by the NMLRA won by Al Stopler.
David Wright Print
We want to thank all the participants and all the contributors and all the workers for a job well done. John and Linda

Artist of the Month Tammy Woods Moon

May 3, 2011
Tammy Woods

Tammy Woods, artist of the month

We are introducing Tammy Woods, our first female featured artist and horn maker.

She writes: I am 36 years year old. I’ve only been doing horn work for ‘lil over two years. I had found myself out of a job due to health problems (broke my back at 17) and needed funds. My ex-boyfriend introduced me to making horns. He had made a few powder horns and was able to

Tammy at work

educate me. My first was just a little rum horn. Carole at Track Of The Wolf offered me $80 for it and I was tickled. I have just been learning a little more as I go.

Due to my health it takes me a little while to do one, but I think they turn out really pretty (well most times anyway). I have been to a few rendezvous to talk with other Horners, and I

Engraved Cannons

really enjoy it. Now, that I have a new wood lathe (that I got for Christmas) it will help with my production. I have my chair set just for comfort.

The more events I go to, and the more originals I get to look at (and sometimes hold), the more I am learning how to get the feel for aging the horns I make. I have met many

Paneled Horn by Tammy Woods

great individuals willing to answer questions, or offer advice in my studies.

You can reach me at blabber38401@gmail.com.

Tammy also did a MicMac horn.  The MicMac were one of 6 of the Algonquin tribes in New

Mic Mac style horn by Tammy Woods

England and Canada. The designs on the “MicMac” horns were used by all of the 6 tribes, but for some reason these horns are known as MicMac horns. The designs are ancient.

There is an original horn with a MicMac design pictured in Jim Dresslar’s book, “The Engraved Powder Horn”.


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