Archive for May, 2013

WCHF 2013 Report

May 31, 2013

WEST COAST HORN FAIR Little Rock Washington, April 26 27 28 2013

The West Coast Horn Fair for 2013 was held at the Capitol City Rifle and Pistol Club in Little Rock, Washington, just south of Olympia.  We were eager to learn more about horn work, display our horn items that we made, gather supplies for future projects, and to enjoy the camaraderie of fellow craftsmen.

Many of the Participants for the WCHF 2013

Many of the Participants for the WCHF 2013

On Friday, April 26th, we attended a great class on horn engraving.  Some

people brought current engraving projects and worked on them during the class.

Kieth Beard and Chip Kormas working on their scrimshaw projects.

Kieth Beard and Chip Kormas working on their scrimshaw projects.

Steve Vance Scrimshaw Artist

Steve Vance Scrimshaw Artist

Scrimshw Tools brought by Steve Vance

Scrimshw Tools brought by Steve Vance

Harold Moore was honored this year for his contribution to horn making.  He was a pioneer horn maker from the 1970’s . Many of his customers brought in their “Harold Moore” horn to add to his display table.

Harold Moore Pioneer Horn Maker

Harold Moore Pioneer Horn Maker

A discussion on shop safety and horn selection was led by John Shorb. After a talk about horn design and the Golden Mean by Scott Morrison, the participants gathered around the equipment to watch the horns take shape.

John Shorb Teaching one of the many classes.

John Shorb Teaching one of the many classes.

On Saturday, the real fun began.  Our classes expanded by offering live demonstrations of horn building.  Three competent Horners, Glen Sutt, Steve Skillman and Scott Morrison, volunteered to build three powder horns which would later be auctioned.

Glen Sutt making a horn in one day to be auctioned off that evening.

Glen Sutt making a horn in one day to be auctioned off that evening.

Scott Morrison showing Jim Smith and Don Nissen the finer points of horn making.

Scott Morrison showing Jim Smith and Don Nissen the finer points of horn making.

Steve Skillman working on his horn for Saturday.

Steve Skillman working on his horn for Saturday.

All three craftsmen had to hustle to finish their projects by dinnertime on Saturday.  Six meals were included in  the $55.00 registration fee,  Dinner on Friday was provided by Glen Sutt.  Our banquet on Saturday was  prepared by Jim and Laura Smith.  Breakfast  and lunch were prepared by Bo Brown and Don Kerr.  A big thank you to all the people who helped with the food and all the things that had to happen to put on this event.

After the banquet, we had an auction and two different raffles. The main raffle was for everyone who bought a ticket.  Online and mail in ticket sales were brisk. Once we saw the prizes in person, we bought even more tickets. Some prizes were made just for the Horn Fair and others would have been hard to ship. Those items were raffled separately to the Saturday night attendees. We want to thank everyone who donated a raffle prize for this event.  The selection and quality of the prizes were fantastic. We do appreciate the generosity of everyone involved.  Without the raffle prizes, there would be no horn fair.

It is time for the raffle and the auction!

It is time for the raffle and the auction!

The raffle prizes and the winners will be posted in a different area.

HORN COMPETITION

And then there was the horn competition.  The table was full of submissions that challenged the judges’ ability to pick out winners.   Steve Vance took first place in the “Engraved Powder Horn” section, but it wasn’t an easy victory.  Harold Moore won “non-engraved powder horn “and Dave Rase won the “horn item” category.  Glen Sutt won the People’s Choice award with his banded powder horn. Good job to all who entered.

Engraved Powder Horn 1-Steve Vance 2-Henry Frank (Crawdad) 3- Chip Kormas

Engraved Powder Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

Engraved Powder Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

Engraved Horn Contest Winners Steve Vance, Henry Frank (Crawdad), Chip Kormas

Engraved Horn Contest Winners
Steve Vance, Henry Frank (Crawdad), Chip Kormas

Non-engraved Powder Horn 1-David Rase 2-Harold Moore 3- Richard Downs

Non Engraved Powder Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

Non Engraved Powder Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

Non-engraved Powder Horn 2-Harold Moore 1-David Rase  3- Richard Downs

Non-engraved Powder Horn 2-Harold Moore 1-David Rase 3- Richard Downs

Horn Object Blowing Horn, Spoon and Fork, Salt Horn

Non Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

Non Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

1-   Dave Rase 2-  Glenn Sutt 3-   Richard Downs

Non Powder Horn competition Dave Rase , Glenn Sutt, Richard Downs

Non Powder Horn competition
Dave Rase , Glenn Sutt, Richard Downs

People Choice  1-   Glenn Sutt

Glenn Sutt and People's Choice Award

Glenn Sutt and People’s Choice Award

People's Choice Award for best Horn item

People’s Choice Award for best Horn item

On Sunday, there were  three more classes: one by Scott Morrison who talked about installing leather ends on woven horn straps, Steve Vance discussed horn coloration and Jim Hayden talked on books available on horn work.

I will post another article on the Raffle and the Auction.  More pictures coming.

The Capitol City Rifle and Pistol Club is a good venue for this event.  The West Coast Horn Fair for 2014 will be held there next May. We will build on the success of this event with better classes, demonstrations, hands on mentoring and another outstanding raffle.

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Scott and Cathy Sibley Featured Artists

May 29, 2013

Scott and Cathy are featured on the Contemporary Makers Blog by Art and Jan Riser.

They were also featured on my email and on my website.

Scott Sibley at his ranch

Scott Sibley at his ranch

Scott writes for the website Kentucky Longrifles:

I had a great interest in History as a youngster. Living on a dairy farm there was the occasional de-horning of cows and bulls. This gave me a few small horns in with to make BB horns and Pellet horns. I carved myself a flintlock rifle out of a pine board and spent many hours entertaining myself with that and a horn to go with it.

Cathy Sibley

Cathy Sibley

In 1969 I met Cathy, we graduated from high school.  In 1971 we married and I joined the service. While in the service I got my hands on a Green River Rifle Works Leman kit. I assembled it and I needed a horn. A trip to a slaughter house in Boise Idaho provided me with several. I made the horn and one day was scratching on it when Cathy said, “that looks like fun” I handed her a horn and said “sand it down and try it” From that day on my partner became my horn engraver. We fooled and fiddled with a few horns and in 1976. We discovered Rendezvous  We went to one and were told “You kids should make those things and sell them” We were on our way.

Early 1998  horn by Scott and Kathy Sibley

Early 1998 horn by Scott and Kathy Sibley

Horns and scrimshawed Jewelry, as well as my hunting skills, put food on the table and helped pay the bills during my 5 years of college. Upon graduation I had a job in a long away, remote Eskimo village on the west coast of Alaska. My partner and I prepared for our departure to the Last frontier. In our “stuff”, there was my limited supply of tools and a box of horns.

Scott Sibley at his work table

Scott Sibley at his work table in Wyoming

“Strange things are done in the Midnight sun” Cathy and I wanted no part of that and so we stayed at home. I worked on horns and Cathy decorated them for me. We sent completed horns to a friend in Kentucky who was heavily involved in muzzleloading and he found new homes for them.

Kathy Sibley at her work table

Kathy Sibley at her work table in Wyoming

Life in an Eskimo village was unlike anything either of us had experienced. It brought us face to face into the pages of “National Geographics LIVE” We adapted and thrived. Living in our semi truck trailer stacked on 55 gallon oil barrels we made horns, carved fossilized Ivory and I found a new hobby, Selling furs to the Eskimos. I became “The White Whale fur man” “Ithpuk Gusiak”  While walking down the frozen tundra one day I had a revelation, Here in 1979, I was living as close as I could to the 18th century without leaving the country for Asia or Africa.. After that living there, surviving and prospering became a badge of honor for both of us.

Nathan Perry (ancestor) and his discharge papers. Auctioned at the CLA Show 2012

Nathan Perry (ancestor) and his discharge papers. Auctioned at the CLA Show 2012

We stayed for 10 years, leaving in the summers to briefly attend a rendezvous along the way to visit our families in Michigan. All this time our interested in history never ceased and I got into genealogy  I discovered my Great Grand father had been at Gettysburg on Little Round Top and was wounded. I found his Grand Father, Nathan Perry, had served for 8 years in the Continental Army. I found that just under 100 Sibley men had fought for freedom and Liberty during the American Revolution. My horn making took on new dimensions and a new meaning to me. With every one I was making a “tribute” to those who served. To me ,being a DAV, this is especially meaningful.

Wyoming sunset

Wyoming sunset

After the Civil War, my great grandfather didn’t go home, he sat off on a journey of the American West that went on till he died in 1915. His son and his ex wife had went on their separate ways several years earlier. “The old Captain was a hard and bitter man” My Great Grand Mother died, and then my grandfather died in 1917. The only 2 boys to be heirs to this history became step children with no idea of their real family name. I am glad to have dug it up and in finding my Grand fathers grave in central Wyoming I myself have found a home.

I look at my horn making and can rationalize that I am involved in it for a reason.

For the 2013 West Coast Horn Fair, Scott donated an “antiqued” Southern Banded Horn.

Southern Banded Horn by Scott Sibley

Southern Banded Horn by Scott Sibley

Scott and Cathy are the authors of two Best Sellers. The were one of the first to publish a book on building powder horns. Their second book is Building The Southern Banded Horn.

Building the Southern Banded Horn

Building the Southern Banded Horn

Recreating the 18th Century Powder Horn

Recreating the 18th Century Powder Horn