Posts Tagged ‘West Coast Horn Fair’

WEST COAST HORN FAIR 2014

March 13, 2014

This year’s event will again be at the Capitol City Rifle and Pistol Club just South of Olympia.
April 11th, 12th, and 13th 2014
Friday’s discussions will be about styles of horns from different areas and periods.

Lathe work station

Lathe work station

Saturday will be all about heating and shaping horn.  How to flatten horns ,

How to make flat horn sheets to use for combs, cup bottoms, and other objects. We have fork and spoon molds available.

Different ways to heat horn and their strong and weak points.

Forming the butt to the plug, fitting a bottom to a cup or container, and so much more.

Saturday Night Banquet and Awards ceremony. There will be a raffle and an auction.

Six Meals will be provided and camping is available on site.

Camping is available

Camping is available

The three day event is 55.00 including meals or 30.00 for Saturday only, also with meals.

Feel free to contact Steve at his E-mail  sbskillman@yahoo.com for info or to register.

Link for Info and directions to C.C.R.P.

Here are some pictures from  last years Horn Fair.  It only touches on some of the many events of the weekend.

Glenn Sutt on lathe

Glenn Sutt on lathe

Demonstrations on different machines

Demonstrations on different machines

Classrooms

Classrooms

Classrooms

Classrooms

Display Tables

Display Tables

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Horns on display

Horns on display

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Horn Items for sale and on display

Horn Items for sale and on display

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More Displays

More Displays

Saturday Night Awards

Saturday Night Awards

Many of the participants outside the building

Many of the participants outside the building

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“Freemason Horn, Problems and All” by Kevin Hart

March 13, 2014

Guest Artist Kevin Hart is a good friend of ours from Oregon.  He plans to attend The West Coast Horn Fair this coming April.

Free Mason Horn by Keven Hart

Free Mason Horn by Kevin Hart

Kevin Hart writes: “Have you ever made a horn that from the very beginning and all the way to completion it went smoothly?

You know, from the moment you pick up the raw cow horn, it tells you what it wants to become, from design, to shaping, scrimshawing and staining.
You and the horn form a single creative instrument!
For many of my horns this is what happens. . .
EXCEPT IN THIS CASE!

For this horn, from the very beginning, it was a match of wills, wits, and staying the course.

In the end, who would emerge victorious?
I’m still not sure who won, perhaps it was a split decision?
The battle began after purchasing another fine raw horn on eBay from our friends at Powderhornsandmore.

eBay horn 1260

eBay horn 1260

It all began innocently at first, the symbiotic forces were flowing between the horn and me.
I started with an initial design layout and since the horn was thick, I decided on a lobed horn.

Raw horn cut and wing (lobe) installed.

Raw horn cut and wing (lobe) installed.

The horn was very oval with a noticeable sharp bend along the bottom butt.
It was also very thick from the tip to the butt.
Having worked oval horns in the past, I have a couple of oval forming blocks to allow for some conformity, with the goal of smoothly out the crease along the bottom.
The trouble began when trying to install the forming block.
After a minute in the hot oil bath (Mr. Fry Daddy), the horn was soft enough and I inserted the block.
After a few stern taps, the block was seated nicely and I set it down to dry and cool.
After an appropriate waiting period, I picked up the horn to view its progress.
That’s when I noticed the 1 ½ inch crack along the bottom.
#@&*^$#$#@ Strike 1
Well, there goes my lobed horn and about 1 ½ inches of nice white scrimshaw palate from the butt area.

I tend to appreciate horns that present longer throats. Since this horn was going to reflect symbols associated with the Freemasons, in particular the two-headed eagle, I decided to add a double layer of eagle feathers on the throat right after the engrailing, followed by octagonal flats all the way up to the small rounded tip, interrupted by two small wedding bands.

Throat with eagle feathers, engrailing, octagonal flats rounded tip,  and two small wedding bands

Throat with eagle feathers, engrailing, octagonal flats rounded tip, and two small wedding bands

While doing some final scraping on the bottom edge of the octagon throat, I noticed a small 1/8 inch speck appear.
What in the world??? Can it be that I have scraped and sanding through a 3/16 inch thick horn to the cavity?
@#@$%$$*#@ Strike 2
Quick. . . . Fire up the Mustang, put the top down, and blow away the cobwebs.
So, after half a tank of gas and a few layers of epoxy blended with horn shavings, the small hole was repaired.

At this point I’m pleased to say, the horn and I came to an understanding.
If it wouldn’t present any more challenges, I wouldn’t leave it in the fry daddy overnight.
On the positive side, the horn had lots of soft white surface area allowing me to scrim to my heart’s delight.

In the White

In the White

Titled: The Freemason Horn
Time period: Revolutionary War 1777
Horn length: 14 ½ inches
Throat: 6 inches stained black/dark brown (beginning at the engrailing area, the throat has two sections of what I call eagle tail feathers, then transitions to octagonal to the rounded tip interrupted by two small wedding bands.
Worn: Left side
Body: Stained light/medium yellow with brown undertones
Inscriptions: Within cartouche. Blank area for owner’s name, His horn at Fort Trumbull, January ye 30th AD 1777
“Live upon the level, park upon the square”
Butt plug: Tiger maple (Oval in shape)
Tip: Antique fiddle peg (black)
Finial: Turned & aged copper
Carvings: Freemason Symbols
Top: Sun, Moon with 7 stars, compass & square, parked cannon with 1st American flag (coiled snake) and 13 Stars & Stripes with various standards, trumpets, cannon balls and helmet.

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Top: Sun, Moon with 7 stars, compass & square, with parked cannon

Left side:

In the white

In the white

Left side: All seeing eye over cartouche with inscription, & level

Left side: All seeing eye over cartouche with inscription, & level

Right Side:

Right Side In the White

Right Side In the White

Hour glass, two headed Eagle with Freemasons banner, Masonic handshake, checker board with sprig of Acacia plant and Maker’s Mark.

Hour glass, two headed Eagle with Freemasons banner, Masonic handshake, checker board with sprig of Acacia plant and Maker’s Mark.

Detail of the Base plug:

Base plug with an aged turned copper finial

Base plug with an aged turned copper finial

This horn with the owner’s name engraved is available from Kevin Hart.

WCHF 2013 Report

May 31, 2013

WEST COAST HORN FAIR Little Rock Washington, April 26 27 28 2013

The West Coast Horn Fair for 2013 was held at the Capitol City Rifle and Pistol Club in Little Rock, Washington, just south of Olympia.  We were eager to learn more about horn work, display our horn items that we made, gather supplies for future projects, and to enjoy the camaraderie of fellow craftsmen.

Many of the Participants for the WCHF 2013

Many of the Participants for the WCHF 2013

On Friday, April 26th, we attended a great class on horn engraving.  Some

people brought current engraving projects and worked on them during the class.

Kieth Beard and Chip Kormas working on their scrimshaw projects.

Kieth Beard and Chip Kormas working on their scrimshaw projects.

Steve Vance Scrimshaw Artist

Steve Vance Scrimshaw Artist

Scrimshw Tools brought by Steve Vance

Scrimshw Tools brought by Steve Vance

Harold Moore was honored this year for his contribution to horn making.  He was a pioneer horn maker from the 1970’s . Many of his customers brought in their “Harold Moore” horn to add to his display table.

Harold Moore Pioneer Horn Maker

Harold Moore Pioneer Horn Maker

A discussion on shop safety and horn selection was led by John Shorb. After a talk about horn design and the Golden Mean by Scott Morrison, the participants gathered around the equipment to watch the horns take shape.

John Shorb Teaching one of the many classes.

John Shorb Teaching one of the many classes.

On Saturday, the real fun began.  Our classes expanded by offering live demonstrations of horn building.  Three competent Horners, Glen Sutt, Steve Skillman and Scott Morrison, volunteered to build three powder horns which would later be auctioned.

Glen Sutt making a horn in one day to be auctioned off that evening.

Glen Sutt making a horn in one day to be auctioned off that evening.

Scott Morrison showing Jim Smith and Don Nissen the finer points of horn making.

Scott Morrison showing Jim Smith and Don Nissen the finer points of horn making.

Steve Skillman working on his horn for Saturday.

Steve Skillman working on his horn for Saturday.

All three craftsmen had to hustle to finish their projects by dinnertime on Saturday.  Six meals were included in  the $55.00 registration fee,  Dinner on Friday was provided by Glen Sutt.  Our banquet on Saturday was  prepared by Jim and Laura Smith.  Breakfast  and lunch were prepared by Bo Brown and Don Kerr.  A big thank you to all the people who helped with the food and all the things that had to happen to put on this event.

After the banquet, we had an auction and two different raffles. The main raffle was for everyone who bought a ticket.  Online and mail in ticket sales were brisk. Once we saw the prizes in person, we bought even more tickets. Some prizes were made just for the Horn Fair and others would have been hard to ship. Those items were raffled separately to the Saturday night attendees. We want to thank everyone who donated a raffle prize for this event.  The selection and quality of the prizes were fantastic. We do appreciate the generosity of everyone involved.  Without the raffle prizes, there would be no horn fair.

It is time for the raffle and the auction!

It is time for the raffle and the auction!

The raffle prizes and the winners will be posted in a different area.

HORN COMPETITION

And then there was the horn competition.  The table was full of submissions that challenged the judges’ ability to pick out winners.   Steve Vance took first place in the “Engraved Powder Horn” section, but it wasn’t an easy victory.  Harold Moore won “non-engraved powder horn “and Dave Rase won the “horn item” category.  Glen Sutt won the People’s Choice award with his banded powder horn. Good job to all who entered.

Engraved Powder Horn 1-Steve Vance 2-Henry Frank (Crawdad) 3- Chip Kormas

Engraved Powder Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

Engraved Powder Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

Engraved Horn Contest Winners Steve Vance, Henry Frank (Crawdad), Chip Kormas

Engraved Horn Contest Winners
Steve Vance, Henry Frank (Crawdad), Chip Kormas

Non-engraved Powder Horn 1-David Rase 2-Harold Moore 3- Richard Downs

Non Engraved Powder Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

Non Engraved Powder Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

Non-engraved Powder Horn 2-Harold Moore 1-David Rase  3- Richard Downs

Non-engraved Powder Horn 2-Harold Moore 1-David Rase 3- Richard Downs

Horn Object Blowing Horn, Spoon and Fork, Salt Horn

Non Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

Non Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

1-   Dave Rase 2-  Glenn Sutt 3-   Richard Downs

Non Powder Horn competition Dave Rase , Glenn Sutt, Richard Downs

Non Powder Horn competition
Dave Rase , Glenn Sutt, Richard Downs

People Choice  1-   Glenn Sutt

Glenn Sutt and People's Choice Award

Glenn Sutt and People’s Choice Award

People's Choice Award for best Horn item

People’s Choice Award for best Horn item

On Sunday, there were  three more classes: one by Scott Morrison who talked about installing leather ends on woven horn straps, Steve Vance discussed horn coloration and Jim Hayden talked on books available on horn work.

I will post another article on the Raffle and the Auction.  More pictures coming.

The Capitol City Rifle and Pistol Club is a good venue for this event.  The West Coast Horn Fair for 2014 will be held there next May. We will build on the success of this event with better classes, demonstrations, hands on mentoring and another outstanding raffle.

Scott and Cathy Sibley Featured Artists

May 29, 2013

Scott and Cathy are featured on the Contemporary Makers Blog by Art and Jan Riser.

They were also featured on my email and on my website.

Scott Sibley at his ranch

Scott Sibley at his ranch

Scott writes for the website Kentucky Longrifles:

I had a great interest in History as a youngster. Living on a dairy farm there was the occasional de-horning of cows and bulls. This gave me a few small horns in with to make BB horns and Pellet horns. I carved myself a flintlock rifle out of a pine board and spent many hours entertaining myself with that and a horn to go with it.

Cathy Sibley

Cathy Sibley

In 1969 I met Cathy, we graduated from high school.  In 1971 we married and I joined the service. While in the service I got my hands on a Green River Rifle Works Leman kit. I assembled it and I needed a horn. A trip to a slaughter house in Boise Idaho provided me with several. I made the horn and one day was scratching on it when Cathy said, “that looks like fun” I handed her a horn and said “sand it down and try it” From that day on my partner became my horn engraver. We fooled and fiddled with a few horns and in 1976. We discovered Rendezvous  We went to one and were told “You kids should make those things and sell them” We were on our way.

Early 1998  horn by Scott and Kathy Sibley

Early 1998 horn by Scott and Kathy Sibley

Horns and scrimshawed Jewelry, as well as my hunting skills, put food on the table and helped pay the bills during my 5 years of college. Upon graduation I had a job in a long away, remote Eskimo village on the west coast of Alaska. My partner and I prepared for our departure to the Last frontier. In our “stuff”, there was my limited supply of tools and a box of horns.

Scott Sibley at his work table

Scott Sibley at his work table in Wyoming

“Strange things are done in the Midnight sun” Cathy and I wanted no part of that and so we stayed at home. I worked on horns and Cathy decorated them for me. We sent completed horns to a friend in Kentucky who was heavily involved in muzzleloading and he found new homes for them.

Kathy Sibley at her work table

Kathy Sibley at her work table in Wyoming

Life in an Eskimo village was unlike anything either of us had experienced. It brought us face to face into the pages of “National Geographics LIVE” We adapted and thrived. Living in our semi truck trailer stacked on 55 gallon oil barrels we made horns, carved fossilized Ivory and I found a new hobby, Selling furs to the Eskimos. I became “The White Whale fur man” “Ithpuk Gusiak”  While walking down the frozen tundra one day I had a revelation, Here in 1979, I was living as close as I could to the 18th century without leaving the country for Asia or Africa.. After that living there, surviving and prospering became a badge of honor for both of us.

Nathan Perry (ancestor) and his discharge papers. Auctioned at the CLA Show 2012

Nathan Perry (ancestor) and his discharge papers. Auctioned at the CLA Show 2012

We stayed for 10 years, leaving in the summers to briefly attend a rendezvous along the way to visit our families in Michigan. All this time our interested in history never ceased and I got into genealogy  I discovered my Great Grand father had been at Gettysburg on Little Round Top and was wounded. I found his Grand Father, Nathan Perry, had served for 8 years in the Continental Army. I found that just under 100 Sibley men had fought for freedom and Liberty during the American Revolution. My horn making took on new dimensions and a new meaning to me. With every one I was making a “tribute” to those who served. To me ,being a DAV, this is especially meaningful.

Wyoming sunset

Wyoming sunset

After the Civil War, my great grandfather didn’t go home, he sat off on a journey of the American West that went on till he died in 1915. His son and his ex wife had went on their separate ways several years earlier. “The old Captain was a hard and bitter man” My Great Grand Mother died, and then my grandfather died in 1917. The only 2 boys to be heirs to this history became step children with no idea of their real family name. I am glad to have dug it up and in finding my Grand fathers grave in central Wyoming I myself have found a home.

I look at my horn making and can rationalize that I am involved in it for a reason.

For the 2013 West Coast Horn Fair, Scott donated an “antiqued” Southern Banded Horn.

Southern Banded Horn by Scott Sibley

Southern Banded Horn by Scott Sibley

Scott and Cathy are the authors of two Best Sellers. The were one of the first to publish a book on building powder horns. Their second book is Building The Southern Banded Horn.

Building the Southern Banded Horn

Building the Southern Banded Horn

Recreating the 18th Century Powder Horn

Recreating the 18th Century Powder Horn

West Coast Horn Fair 2013 Raffle Prizes

March 12, 2013

The West Coast Horn fair will be held in Littlerock WA April 26, 27 and 28 2013. The event is funded entirely by raffle tickets.  Horn makers from all over the US have donated prizes for this raffle.

You do not need to be present to win. We mail the prizes to you at no cost to you. For a complete list of all the prizes and a link to buy tickets click HERE

Southern Banded Horn by Scott Sibley

Southern Banded Horn by Scott Sibley

This Southern Banded Powder Horn was donated by Scott Sibley.  The horn measures 13″ around the double curve.  Scott filed the horn to make it much lighter in weight. The tip is turned Whitetail antler and it done in two pieces as were the majority of original horns. The tip and bands are fastened with wooden pegs.

Applied Tip on Sibley's Horn

Applied Tip on Sibley’s Horn

There are four turned bands. The base plug is cherry, turned with a “wasp waist” design as per an original “Shenandoah Valley” horn that is in Scott’s collection.  The dark color is also like the original horn.

Wampum beaded Belt “Hawkeye Belt”donated by Gary Bertelsen

Wampum belt patterned after the movie The Last of the Mohicans. By Gary Bertelsen

Wampum belt patterned after the movie The Last of the Mohicans. By Gary Bertelsen

This is designed after the belt Daniel Day Lewis used as a horn belt in the
movie “Last of the Mohicans” also known at the “Hawkeye Belt”

It is made with replica wampum beads, woven on brain tanned deer hide
laces with artificial sinew.

Measures (beaded portion) 50 inches plus 15 inches of lace fringe on each
end – At 50 inches, this is a strap that will fit a Big Boy. gbertels@insight.rr.com

“Osceola” beaded garters.

Second prize by Gary Bertelsen (no picture yet)I included a set of “Osceola” beaded garters.   These are based on the original piece at the National Museum of the American Indian which says they were actually worn by Osceola and included in a George Catlin painting. gbertels@insight.rr.com

Horn Box donated by Tim Sanner

Horn Box donated by Tim Sanner

Horn Box donated by Tim Sanner

Tim Sanner is a Journeyman Horner in the Honourable Company of Horners.  This little container is called a Horn Box. The box is made of cow horn with a walnut base.  The lid is turned walnut with a white horn ring.  It measures 3 1/2″ tall and 2 1/2″ in diameter. This is a piece anyone would be proud to own.

13 WCHF Yosef

Artist Proof on cow horn by Yosef Trilling

13 WCHF Yosef (640x480)

Artist Proof on cow horn by Yosef Trilling

Two artist’s proof horns engraved by Yosef Trilling. He takes a cow horn and engraves a new subject to see exactly how it will look on the curved and limited surface of the horn. Yosef can be found on eBay and the CLA site. Also atrilling@kc.rr.com.

Engraving tool made and donated by David Rase.

Engraving tool made and donanted by David Rase.

Engraving tool made and donated by David Rase.

Engraving Tool by David Rase

This tool can be used to do some fine engraving on a powder horn. The tip is a Coulter Precision carbide point held in place with a set screw so the tip can be changed out when it gets dull.  Dave hand turned the brass holder and installed a blue grip cushion.  You can reach David  at davidrase@q.com

THE HARTLEY HORN DRAWINGS

This hard back book was donated by Jeff Bibb at The Honourable Company of Horners.

Robert M. Hartley made these drawings documenting historic powder horns. The  drawings are laid out so you see all sides of the horn. There are close-up photos of  the Royal Coat of Arms, rivers, cities and towns, forts and animals.

The Hartley Horn Drawings donated by The Honourable Company of Horners

The Hartley Horn Drawings donated by The Honourable Company of Horners

Detail from the pages of The Hartley Book
Detail from the pages of The Hartley Book

Detail from the pages of The Hartley Book

Detail from the pages of The Hartley Book

West Coast Horn Fair 2012 Report

June 11, 2012

SECOND ANNUAL WEST COAST HORN FAIR

An enthusiastic group of people gathered in Morro Bay, California on Friday and Saturday, April 27 and 28, 2012. It was hosted by John and Linda Shorb, owners of Powder Horns and More.

Visitors at the display tables

Participants and visitors were from Washington, Oregon, Nevada, and many parts of California. At 10 AM, Scott Morrison and John Shorb played their blowing horn serenade across the floor of the hall. This signaled the opening of the West Coast Horn Fair.

Examples Steve Vance brought for his talk

Steve Vance gave a two-hour talk on historic types of scrimshaw. He gave many illustrations and had several horns that showcased his topic. He discussed historical viewpoint, tips on achieving a better appearance, and the layout of scenes on a horn.

Steve Skillman at his table before his presentation

Next, Steve Skillman presented a talk about the specialized tools he uses in his horn work. High points included the thought of heating and bending files, the use of pen mills to square horn tips, and examples of many of the files Steve uses in his work. Ace Hardware is not the last place one should look for files. They are available from many other sources.

John Shorb teaching his class on blowing horns

John Shorb then discussed blowing horns. The size and thickness of the tip of a blowing horn is a major concern, as it has to be big enough to work with. He uses a hole saw to shape the outer edge of the mouthpiece and a pen mill to drill the inner recess.

A Dremel tool can be used to contour the inside of the mouthpiece. After that, it is just sand and polish.

Steve Skillman, Don Kerr and Steve Vance before the class on period correct horn repair.

Most of us gathered at Dorn’s Breakers Restaurant for dinner and great fellowship. We had a private dining room for our use. The food was fantastic, and the conversations were even better.

Horn examples for John Shorb’s class on horn selection and what makes a good or a bad horn.

Scott and John again provided a rousing chorus on their blowing horns, signaling the start of classes for the next day.

John Shorb discussed several topics, the first of which was shop safety. Keeping the eyes, ears and fingers all attached and in good working order is a prerequisite for happy horn making. Dust control and protection was also stressed. Next, he talked about horn selection, not trying to turn ugly horns into pretty powder horns, appropriate sizes, and right and left-side carry horns. He also discussed the first steps he takes in making a powder horn and the tools he uses, and why those steps are taken.

Scott Morrison talking on The placement of rings panels and grooves.

Scott Morrison next talked about The Golden Mean concept and how it figures into horn design. He discussed how to lay out horns for the placement of rings, panels, and grooves. The concept is to divide the horn into 8 segments, the body will comprise 5 segments and the neck will be 3. The old saying, “The eye don’t lie!” tells it all. If it doesn’t look right, it isn’t

Some participants attending the class on horn finishes.

After another Divine Catering lunch we waddled back into the class room for a round table discussion led by Scott Morrison and Steve Skillman on various horn finishes and finishing techniques. RIT dyes, potassium permanganate, acids, and natural dyes like walnut stain; berries, onionskins, etc were discussed.

A small part of the Horn books that Jim Hayden brought and discussed.

Next, our itinerate book peddler, Jim Hayden, discussed some of the many books available on the subject of powder horns. He left us all with a great bibliography on the subject and a CD filled with engraving scenes suitable for horn work.

In final session we talked about next year’s West Coast Horn Fair. We will try to implement many of the new ideas. It will be held on April 26 and 27th, 2013 in either Washington or Oregon. Details will be posted in the Powder Horns and More newsletter and www.westcoasthornfair.com.

Our Banquet

Finishing off the event was a banquet fit for a king. A crew from Cayucos Community Church came in, prepared a sumptuous feast. They cooked tri-tip roasts on the barbecue pit. And in addition they served a spring mix salad, oven cooked rice pilaf and candied carrots. For desert, there was a sheet cake with the West Coast Horn Fair logo powder horn on it.

The grand prize winner of the NMLRA 1 of 1000 print by David Wright.

Tickets for the Raffle prizes were drawn, and there were many happy winners. About half were from mail in tickets and the other half were bought at the event.

In closing, I would like to thank all the people who registered and attended, and the people who bought raffle tickets. Steve Vance, Steve Skillman, Scott Morrison, and Jim Hayden did a great job of making presentations. Thanks to my wife, Linda Shorb, who puts up with me on a daily basis. Without her, this would not have come about. The event was informative, successful and loads of fun. Hope to see you next year.

BLACK HORN AND CHERRY BOX by John DeWald Raffle Prize for West Coast Horn Fair

April 12, 2012

We are very pleased to feature this Black Horn Box by John DeWald. It is a raffle prize for the West Coast Horn Fair, which will be held the end of April 2012.  (You do not have to be present to win.)

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Black Horn Box by John deWald

The horn is naturally black and the ends are cherry wood. The pull is antler. John  DeWald, known as SauVage, hangs out on The Horners Bench. He calls it his “black-cherry box.”   He can be reached at ahtuwisae@yahoo.com

John added some very personal touches to make this item even more desirable for the upcoming winner.

Near the base of the horn in bold print he engraved the words “BLACK CHERRY”  in letters that are less then an eighth of inch tall.

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Black Cherry

Then he added a drawing of two cherries.

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Two Cherries

In addition, he signed and numbered the box to make it a true collector’s item. It reads “J  DeWald Jr Mar 2012 B #14.”

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J DeWald Jr. Mar 2012 B #14

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Box made from cow horn with the lid off.

BUILDING THE SOUTHERN BANDED HORN by Scott and Cathy Sibley

March 2, 2012

Scott and Cathy Sibley are well-know authors of the best “How-to” book on

Latest book by Scott and Cathy Sibley

building powder horns. They wrote the “Bible of horn making”, called “Recreating the 18th Century Powder Horn” in 2005.

From the Dick Gadler Collection

Scott and Cathy have written a second book on  powder horns. “Building the Southern Banded Horn”,  is a welcome addition to all of us interested in learning more about powder horns.

It does not matter whether you are a builder, contemporary collector or antique southern horn collector there is something for everyone.  The builders out there will find comprehensive coverage on building a southern banded horn.

All the steps are beautifully photographed and Scott’s instructions are dead on.  I don’t ever plan to attempt to build one of these horns, but I enjoyed seeing the process involved. With all the information included I’m sure the novice as well as the advanced builder will find something useful.

 

For the contemporary collector there are a number of striking photographs of Scott and Cathy’s work.  The photographs are composed using a great many wonderful contemporary bags, guns, measures, knives, and axes along with an equal number of antique objects.

There is also a section that features antique southern banded horns from private collections.  Many of these horns have never been photographed.  Several very nice antique accouterments are included in the section.

The Sibley’s book deserves a place in the libraries of all those who have a fondness for the southern banded horn.  Builders and collectors alike will certainly enjoy this volume.

The book  will have 128 pages.  It is full color and has about 57 color pictures (full page)  of horns.  Two-thirds of the horns are originals.

The book will be available soon through PowderHorns and More.

 

It should not take very long for the first printing to be finished.  Scott’s previous book went through 3 printings!

Available through us at www.powderhornsandmore.com

We accept Pay Pal, check or Money Order.

Price is 29.95 plus 4.00 Freight. The book is in stock and can be shipped tomorrow!

http://www.powderhornsandmore.com/quotbuilding-the-southern-banded-hornquot-by-scott-and-cathy-sibley.html

Latest book review by Rick Sheets

http://www.blackpowder411.com/book-review/building-the-southern-banded-horn-a-book-review/

Rick Froehlich Horn Maker

January 11, 2012
Rick was one of the many people that helped us organize The West

Rick Froehlich

Coast Horn Fair. 

The Contemporary Makers Blog featured Rick in March 2011. 

My name’s Rick Froehlich and I have been making powder horns and related horn items since about 1975, when I started attending and participating in many local and national muzzleloading events with my wife and four sons. 

I have always been pretty good in making about anything that I put my mind to and always have enjoyed studying and researching many of the early American skills and arms. 

Rum Horn

Rum Horn Buffalo

I decided to start researching and seeking out examples in museums and a few private antique arms collections, as well as having the opportunity to sit down and talk with experts on the subject of powder horns while attending national rendezvous and other events. 

West Coast Horn Fair Prize 2011

I am a member in THE HONOURABLE COMPANY OF HORNERS and a moderator on the HORNERS BENCH website forum. Today, there are many new folks starting out making horns and we always enjoy seeing new people!

Froehlich Ye Hunter Horn

I have always felt that, “Getting something from a friend …is getting a part of that person’s life!”

  rfroehlich1948@cox.net

And the winners are:

May 4, 2011
Everyone of the participants are the real winners. All the people who supported the event with prizes and buying raffle tickets are winners in our book. The teachers of the many classes felt like winners when the faces of the attendees light up as they absorb all the new ideas.
Here is a list of the donors and the names of the winners!Subscription of Muzzleloader Magazine  Won by Scott Morrison, participant
Powder Horn strap by Lynn Blevens won by David Resler

Skillman Strap

Weaving Welchman Strap

Powder Horn strap by Lynn Blevens red, white and blue won by Paul Butcher.
Powder Horn strap by Pam Skillman won by Don Kerr, participant
Powder Horn strap by Kris Pelizzi won by Scott Morrison, participant

Glenn Sutt Knife

Leather hide donated by James Eastman won by Bob Kopner
Knife by Glenn Sutt won by Don Opalewski
Horn Oven by David Rase won by Scott Morrison, participant
Leather Bag by Jim Smith won by Don Kerr, participant

Artist’s Proof on horn by Yosef won by Chip Kormas, participant
Horn Measure by Roger Hodge won by George Hey

Primer by Jerry Frank

Priming Flask by Jerry Frank won by Chris Miller, participant
Priming Horn by Chip Kormas won by Ron Smith

Primer by Steve Lodding

Priming Horn by Steve Lodding won by Steve Skillman, participant

Banded Horn by Scott Morrison won by Jim

Scott Morrison Banded Horn

Smith, participant

Banded horn by Steve Skillman

Banded Horn by Steve Skillman donated by Dave Rase won by Ron Smith, participant
Engraved Powder Horn by Rich Froehlich

Engraved Powder Horn by Rick Froehlich

won by Bo Brown, participant

Joint horn by John Shorb and Don Opalowski

Engraved Horn by Don Opalewski made by John Shorb won by Jim Smith, participant

Tinder Box by Willy Frankfort won by Don Opalewski

Tinder Box by Willy Frankfort

David Wright Print donated by the NMLRA won by Al Stopler.
David Wright Print
We want to thank all the participants and all the contributors and all the workers for a job well done. John and Linda