WCHF 2014 Prizes and winners

May 14, 2014

The West Coast Horn Fair did not ask for prizes from the Horn Making Community this year, but the prizes came pouring in.  There was the auction and the raffle.  I am sorry I do not have pictures of all the prizes.  If you made or won a prize, please send me a picture and I will update this post.

We are grateful for the many fantastic raffle and auction prizes. Two different horn and bag combinations were donated by Scott Morrison and Ron Hess.

Bag, Horn, Measure, Pick and Pan Brush by Scott Morrison

Bag, Horn, Measure, Pick and Pan Brush by Scott Morrison won by Shawn Martin

Ron Hess Horn and Ed McDilda bag, donated by Ron Hess

Ron Hess Horn and Ed McDilda bag, donated by Ron Hess won by Bo Brown

More items were sent in to support The West Coast Horn Fair.

These items were donated by the participants.

Containers by Steve Skillman

Containers by Steve Skillman won by Chip Kormas

Cup and screw top container by Ed McDilda. Donated by Chip Kormas

Cup and screw top container by Ed McDilda. Donated by Chip Kormas  won by Tim Sampson

Horn Handled Knife by Glenn Sutt

Horn Handled Knife by Glenn Sutt Won by Jim Smith

Franklin County Screw tip Flat Horn by Glenn Sutt

Franklin County Screw tip Flat Horn by Glenn Sutt. High bidder was Scott Morrison

Hand knitted horn socks by Pam Skillman

Hand knitted horn socks by Pam Skillman

Auction items that are waiting for pictures.

Camp chair by Will Ulery Won by Glenn Sutt

A framed and matted Print by Bill Conant. Won by Chris Statz

Buffalo Horn by Harold Moore. Won by BO Brown.

HERE IS THE LIST OF DONATIONS AND WINNERS for the raffle

Book Powder Horns Fabrication and Decoration. Donated by Don Kerr. Won by Harold Moore
Hand forged knife and sheath donated by BO Brown Won by Kyle Martin.
We had two Knife kits donated by Roger Hodge with Green River blades. Won by Nancy Moore and Rich Downs.
Scrimshawed Salt and Pepper container of antler by Kieth Beard Won by BO Brown.
Horn Spoon (show project) by Glenn Sutt Won by Steve Baima.
Necklace pincushion by Kieth Beard, donated by BO Brown Won by Dave Rase.
Antler Flask by Scott Morrison Won by Lloyd Chase.
Buffalo priming horn by Harold Moore Won by Kevin Thiel.
Salt horn by Skillman Won by Dave Rase.
Small table horn by Skillman Won by Don Kerr.
Framed photo by Nancy Moore Won by Shawn Martin.
Deluxe Cureton Horn by John Shorb Won by Kevin Hart.

The Hartley Book donated by The Honourable Company of Horners was won by

The Hartley Book donated by The Honourable Company of Horners was won by Roger Hodge

 

Powder Horn by John Shorb Raffle item won by Keven Hart

Powder Horn by John Shorb Raffle item won by Keven Hart

 

Horn straps by Lynn Blevens, Weaving Welshman (won by Glenn Sutt); Kris Polizzi Custom Weaving (won by Glenn Sutt) ; Strap by Bo Brown (won by Scott Morrison)

Horn straps by Lynn Blevens, Weaving Welshman (won by Bill Conant); Kris Polizzi Custom Weaving (won by Glenn Sutt) ; Strap by Bo Brown (won by Scott Morrison)

Hand knitted horn socks by Pam Skillman Won by Glenn Sutt, ,Kyle Martin, and Chip Kormas.

Hand knitted horn socks by Pam Skillman Won by Glenn Sutt, ,Kyle Martin, and Chip Kormas.



The participants were having way to much fun and made this sign to give John Shorb  a very bad time.

 

Honest John's Used Horns CHEAP  One owner OK Used Horns.

Honest John’s Used Horns
CHEAP
One owner OK Used Horns.

Cow Horns lined up in a row! Don't they look pretty.

Cow Horns lined up in a row! Don’t they look pretty.

We want to thank Steve Skillman, Scott Morrison, Glen Sutt, Chip Kormas, Steve Bama, Bo Brown, Don Kerr, Shawn Martin and Kyle Martin. Jim and Laura Smith cooked all weekend. They brought their killer brownies. Rodger Hodge made badges for participants. Many others worked hard to put this event together.

Next year will be held the First weekend in May at the Capitol City Gun Club in Little Rock WA. We have more ideas, more teachers and more events to present to all the horn makers.

 

 

 

West Coast Horn Fair 2014 A Success!

April 30, 2014

This year’s West Coast Horn Fair was held April 11th, 12th, and 13th 2014 at the Capitol City Rifle and Pistol Club just South of Olympia. The focus was on Heating and Shaping horns. Friday and Sunday were classes and perusing the many display tables. The highlights were discussions on style, schools, periods and horns and architecture.  Many of the participants were discussed what they want for future events.  Everyone is coming back!  John, Linda, Steve and Jim do not want to miss next years West Coast Horn Fair!  (Photos by Steve Skillman except where noted.)

Glen Sutt's table

Glen Sutt’s table

Scott Morrison's Table

Scott Morrison’s Table

Jerry Frank's  table (Crawdad)

Jerry Frank’s table (Crawdad)

Powder Horns and More's Table

Powder Horns and More’s Table

Bo Brown's Table

Bo Brown’s Table

Last year a table was set up for Harold Moore as the Honored Horner of the year. He was Steve Skillman’s  partner when they first started giving horn making classes with the Gunmakers Guild many years ago. Not long after the W.C.H.F. last year, Harold suffered a stroke.  A noted artist in our area, Bill Connant, agreed to do a portrait of Harold for presentation at this years event on Saturday night. The West Coast Horn Fair 2014 honored Harold Moore, a influential Horn Maker from the West Coast.

Harold and Patty Moore with Bill Conant. Photo my Mike Nesbitt

Harold and Patty Moore with Bill Conant. Photo by Mike Nesbitt

Portrait of Harold Moore

Portrait of Harold Moore.  Photo by Mike Nesbitt

 

There were demonstrations on making flat horns, spoons, and horn sheets.

One of many Flat horns in a  vise

One of many Flat horns in a vise

Flat horn before inserting base plug.

Don Nissen is holding the flat horn as they prepare to insert the base plug.

Glen Sutt working on a flat horn as Rodger Hodge, Crawdad, Scott Morrison, Lloyd and Chip Kormas look on.

Glen Sutt working on a flat horn as Rodger Hodge, Crawdad, Scott Morrison, Lloyd and Chip Kormas look on.

Many flat horns were made as well as spoons and flat pieces for combs and other items.

Horn spoon

Horn spoon

proj Flattened Horn Sheets

Horn sheets

Here are some of the tools used in the shaping of horn.

One of the many heating pots.

Glenn Sutt working with one of the many heating pots.

Proj Wooden forms for flat horns

Wooden Forms for flat horns

Proj Spoon Sutt Mold

Horn Spoon Mold

A chinning tool is used to inscribe a line at the bottom of the cup.

This chinning tool was made at the fair.

This chinning tool was made at the fair.

 

We want to thank Steve Skillman, Scott Morrison, Glen Sutt, Chip Kormas, Steve Bama, Bo Brown, Don Kerr, Shawn Martin and Kyle Martin. Jim and Laura Smith cooked all weekend. They brought their killer brownies. Rodger Hodge made badges for participants. Many others worked hard to put this event together.

Next year will be held the First weekend in May at the Capitol City Gun Club in Little Rock WA. We have more ideas, more teachers and more events to present to all the horn makers.

 

WEST COAST HORN FAIR 2014

March 13, 2014

This year’s event will again be at the Capitol City Rifle and Pistol Club just South of Olympia.
April 11th, 12th, and 13th 2014
Friday’s discussions will be about styles of horns from different areas and periods.

Lathe work station

Lathe work station

Saturday will be all about heating and shaping horn.  How to flatten horns ,

How to make flat horn sheets to use for combs, cup bottoms, and other objects. We have fork and spoon molds available.

Different ways to heat horn and their strong and weak points.

Forming the butt to the plug, fitting a bottom to a cup or container, and so much more.

Saturday Night Banquet and Awards ceremony. There will be a raffle and an auction.

Six Meals will be provided and camping is available on site.

Camping is available

Camping is available

The three day event is 55.00 including meals or 30.00 for Saturday only, also with meals.

Feel free to contact Steve at his E-mail  sbskillman@yahoo.com for info or to register.

Link for Info and directions to C.C.R.P.

Here are some pictures from  last years Horn Fair.  It only touches on some of the many events of the weekend.

Glenn Sutt on lathe

Glenn Sutt on lathe

Demonstrations on different machines

Demonstrations on different machines

Classrooms

Classrooms

Classrooms

Classrooms

Display Tables

Display Tables

IMG_6101 IMG_6086

Horns on display

Horns on display

IMG_6098 IMG_6096 IMG_6076

Horn Items for sale and on display

Horn Items for sale and on display

IMG_6064 IMG_6093 IMG_6101 IMG_6108

More Displays

More Displays

Saturday Night Awards

Saturday Night Awards

Many of the participants outside the building

Many of the participants outside the building

“Freemason Horn, Problems and All” by Kevin Hart

March 13, 2014

Guest Artist Kevin Hart is a good friend of ours from Oregon.  He plans to attend The West Coast Horn Fair this coming April.

Free Mason Horn by Keven Hart

Free Mason Horn by Kevin Hart

Kevin Hart writes: “Have you ever made a horn that from the very beginning and all the way to completion it went smoothly?

You know, from the moment you pick up the raw cow horn, it tells you what it wants to become, from design, to shaping, scrimshawing and staining.
You and the horn form a single creative instrument!
For many of my horns this is what happens. . .
EXCEPT IN THIS CASE!

For this horn, from the very beginning, it was a match of wills, wits, and staying the course.

In the end, who would emerge victorious?
I’m still not sure who won, perhaps it was a split decision?
The battle began after purchasing another fine raw horn on eBay from our friends at Powderhornsandmore.

eBay horn 1260

eBay horn 1260

It all began innocently at first, the symbiotic forces were flowing between the horn and me.
I started with an initial design layout and since the horn was thick, I decided on a lobed horn.

Raw horn cut and wing (lobe) installed.

Raw horn cut and wing (lobe) installed.

The horn was very oval with a noticeable sharp bend along the bottom butt.
It was also very thick from the tip to the butt.
Having worked oval horns in the past, I have a couple of oval forming blocks to allow for some conformity, with the goal of smoothly out the crease along the bottom.
The trouble began when trying to install the forming block.
After a minute in the hot oil bath (Mr. Fry Daddy), the horn was soft enough and I inserted the block.
After a few stern taps, the block was seated nicely and I set it down to dry and cool.
After an appropriate waiting period, I picked up the horn to view its progress.
That’s when I noticed the 1 ½ inch crack along the bottom.
#@&*^$#$#@ Strike 1
Well, there goes my lobed horn and about 1 ½ inches of nice white scrimshaw palate from the butt area.

I tend to appreciate horns that present longer throats. Since this horn was going to reflect symbols associated with the Freemasons, in particular the two-headed eagle, I decided to add a double layer of eagle feathers on the throat right after the engrailing, followed by octagonal flats all the way up to the small rounded tip, interrupted by two small wedding bands.

Throat with eagle feathers, engrailing, octagonal flats rounded tip,  and two small wedding bands

Throat with eagle feathers, engrailing, octagonal flats rounded tip, and two small wedding bands

While doing some final scraping on the bottom edge of the octagon throat, I noticed a small 1/8 inch speck appear.
What in the world??? Can it be that I have scraped and sanding through a 3/16 inch thick horn to the cavity?
@#@$%$$*#@ Strike 2
Quick. . . . Fire up the Mustang, put the top down, and blow away the cobwebs.
So, after half a tank of gas and a few layers of epoxy blended with horn shavings, the small hole was repaired.

At this point I’m pleased to say, the horn and I came to an understanding.
If it wouldn’t present any more challenges, I wouldn’t leave it in the fry daddy overnight.
On the positive side, the horn had lots of soft white surface area allowing me to scrim to my heart’s delight.

In the White

In the White

Titled: The Freemason Horn
Time period: Revolutionary War 1777
Horn length: 14 ½ inches
Throat: 6 inches stained black/dark brown (beginning at the engrailing area, the throat has two sections of what I call eagle tail feathers, then transitions to octagonal to the rounded tip interrupted by two small wedding bands.
Worn: Left side
Body: Stained light/medium yellow with brown undertones
Inscriptions: Within cartouche. Blank area for owner’s name, His horn at Fort Trumbull, January ye 30th AD 1777
“Live upon the level, park upon the square”
Butt plug: Tiger maple (Oval in shape)
Tip: Antique fiddle peg (black)
Finial: Turned & aged copper
Carvings: Freemason Symbols
Top: Sun, Moon with 7 stars, compass & square, parked cannon with 1st American flag (coiled snake) and 13 Stars & Stripes with various standards, trumpets, cannon balls and helmet.

image022

Top: Sun, Moon with 7 stars, compass & square, with parked cannon

Left side:

In the white

In the white

Left side: All seeing eye over cartouche with inscription, & level

Left side: All seeing eye over cartouche with inscription, & level

Right Side:

Right Side In the White

Right Side In the White

Hour glass, two headed Eagle with Freemasons banner, Masonic handshake, checker board with sprig of Acacia plant and Maker’s Mark.

Hour glass, two headed Eagle with Freemasons banner, Masonic handshake, checker board with sprig of Acacia plant and Maker’s Mark.

Detail of the Base plug:

Base plug with an aged turned copper finial

Base plug with an aged turned copper finial

This horn with the owner’s name engraved is available from Kevin Hart.

Cheyenne Ledger Book Powder Horn by Kevin Hart

June 11, 2013

Kevin Hart of Hillsboro Oregon bought this horn from me on eBay last month. He sent me pictures and details on how he made the horn:

“I completed the smaller horn, and figured you might wish to have a look.

Large Cow horn that was listed on eBay

Large Cow horn that was listed on eBay

“Initially I was concerned that the horn might not work.  It had a lot of dark area’s throughout the body but I decided to give it a go and the horn worked perfectly.

Horn after sanding.

Horn after sanding.

Horn before staining.  It looks great just like it is.

Horn just about done, ready for staining. Sometimes I think about not staining a horn because at times they look so good in the white.

This powderhorn is titled, “Cheyenne Ledger Book Horn”.  It depicts a horn made by either a Cheyenne warrior or a trapper of the period who camped around Bent’s Fort or worked at the fort in South-Eastern Colorado around 1837.

CHEYENE LEDGER BOOK HORN by Kevin Hart Done and ready for shining times Top View

CHEYENNE LEDGER BOOK HORN by Kevin Hart
Done and ready for shining times Top View

The Scrimshaw art on it reflects the style found in many period Cheyenne ledger books.

Inside curve of the finished Horn by Kevin Hart

Inside curve of the finished Horn by Kevin Hart

Left side view. This Cheyenne Indian is celebrating another horse stealing raid as a seasoned warrior as depicted by the length of his head dress.

Left side view.
This Cheyenne Indian is celebrating another horse stealing raid as a seasoned warrior as depicted by the length of his head-dress.

I have a great fondness for Ledger Book Art.  Bent’s Fort was a fur trading post on the mountain branch of the Santa Fe Trail where traders, trappers, travelers, and the Cheyenne & Arapaho tribes came together in peaceful terms for trade. A wonderful place to see and explore.

Verse found on horns of the F & I, and Revolutionary war periods.  I took artistic license and used it on a 1837 horn. "Importance of dry powder still applied. Yes, it is so."

Verse found on horns of the F & I, and Revolutionary war periods. I took artistic license and used it on a 1837 horn.
“Importance of dry powder still applied.
Yes, it is so.”

This horn is about 16” long from tip to the back finial.

It features an aged medium yellow body, black throat & high distressed black turned pine base plug.

Banner cartouche showing where horn was made/year and room for owner’s name

Banner cartouche showing where horn was made/year and room for owner’s name

Scene shows Bent’s Fort as it looked from 1833 into the early 1840s.  Many tribes set up their lodges around the fort during trading season .

Also shown is an Indian on a Buffalo hunt, where they would run the Buffalo and bring their horse dangerously close to the animal they were hunting.

My Maker’s mark, where it usually sits these days on the back/bottom of the horn.

Bent’s Fort. Indian on a Buffalo hunt,  My Maker’s mark, where it usually sits these days on the back/bottom of the horn.

Bent’s Fort. Indian on a Buffalo hunt,
My Maker’s mark, where it usually sits these days on the back/bottom of the horn.

The finial is a turned antler horn that’s been highly aged, and the tip is also turned antler horn that I’ve stained and aged as well.

Detail look at the aged antler horn spout & tip.

Detail look at the aged antler horn spout & tip.

The base plug is held in place with brass pins/tacks that have also been aged and the tip is held in place using small thin pins.

Detail look at the aged butt plug and antler horn finial.

Detail look at the aged base plug and antler horn finial.

It features a high degree of engrailing design and scrimshawed art.

The horn can be worn either left or right, but is truly a left side horn.

For more information on this horn an others, contact Kevin Hart, harts.athome@frontier.com

WCHF 2013 Report

May 31, 2013

WEST COAST HORN FAIR Little Rock Washington, April 26 27 28 2013

The West Coast Horn Fair for 2013 was held at the Capitol City Rifle and Pistol Club in Little Rock, Washington, just south of Olympia.  We were eager to learn more about horn work, display our horn items that we made, gather supplies for future projects, and to enjoy the camaraderie of fellow craftsmen.

Many of the Participants for the WCHF 2013

Many of the Participants for the WCHF 2013

On Friday, April 26th, we attended a great class on horn engraving.  Some

people brought current engraving projects and worked on them during the class.

Kieth Beard and Chip Kormas working on their scrimshaw projects.

Kieth Beard and Chip Kormas working on their scrimshaw projects.

Steve Vance Scrimshaw Artist

Steve Vance Scrimshaw Artist

Scrimshw Tools brought by Steve Vance

Scrimshw Tools brought by Steve Vance

Harold Moore was honored this year for his contribution to horn making.  He was a pioneer horn maker from the 1970’s . Many of his customers brought in their “Harold Moore” horn to add to his display table.

Harold Moore Pioneer Horn Maker

Harold Moore Pioneer Horn Maker

A discussion on shop safety and horn selection was led by John Shorb. After a talk about horn design and the Golden Mean by Scott Morrison, the participants gathered around the equipment to watch the horns take shape.

John Shorb Teaching one of the many classes.

John Shorb Teaching one of the many classes.

On Saturday, the real fun began.  Our classes expanded by offering live demonstrations of horn building.  Three competent Horners, Glen Sutt, Steve Skillman and Scott Morrison, volunteered to build three powder horns which would later be auctioned.

Glen Sutt making a horn in one day to be auctioned off that evening.

Glen Sutt making a horn in one day to be auctioned off that evening.

Scott Morrison showing Jim Smith and Don Nissen the finer points of horn making.

Scott Morrison showing Jim Smith and Don Nissen the finer points of horn making.

Steve Skillman working on his horn for Saturday.

Steve Skillman working on his horn for Saturday.

All three craftsmen had to hustle to finish their projects by dinnertime on Saturday.  Six meals were included in  the $55.00 registration fee,  Dinner on Friday was provided by Glen Sutt.  Our banquet on Saturday was  prepared by Jim and Laura Smith.  Breakfast  and lunch were prepared by Bo Brown and Don Kerr.  A big thank you to all the people who helped with the food and all the things that had to happen to put on this event.

After the banquet, we had an auction and two different raffles. The main raffle was for everyone who bought a ticket.  Online and mail in ticket sales were brisk. Once we saw the prizes in person, we bought even more tickets. Some prizes were made just for the Horn Fair and others would have been hard to ship. Those items were raffled separately to the Saturday night attendees. We want to thank everyone who donated a raffle prize for this event.  The selection and quality of the prizes were fantastic. We do appreciate the generosity of everyone involved.  Without the raffle prizes, there would be no horn fair.

It is time for the raffle and the auction!

It is time for the raffle and the auction!

The raffle prizes and the winners will be posted in a different area.

HORN COMPETITION

And then there was the horn competition.  The table was full of submissions that challenged the judges’ ability to pick out winners.   Steve Vance took first place in the “Engraved Powder Horn” section, but it wasn’t an easy victory.  Harold Moore won “non-engraved powder horn “and Dave Rase won the “horn item” category.  Glen Sutt won the People’s Choice award with his banded powder horn. Good job to all who entered.

Engraved Powder Horn 1-Steve Vance 2-Henry Frank (Crawdad) 3- Chip Kormas

Engraved Powder Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

Engraved Powder Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

Engraved Horn Contest Winners Steve Vance, Henry Frank (Crawdad), Chip Kormas

Engraved Horn Contest Winners
Steve Vance, Henry Frank (Crawdad), Chip Kormas

Non-engraved Powder Horn 1-David Rase 2-Harold Moore 3- Richard Downs

Non Engraved Powder Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

Non Engraved Powder Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

Non-engraved Powder Horn 2-Harold Moore 1-David Rase  3- Richard Downs

Non-engraved Powder Horn 2-Harold Moore 1-David Rase 3- Richard Downs

Horn Object Blowing Horn, Spoon and Fork, Salt Horn

Non Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

Non Horn Competition. 1st 2nd 3rd

1-   Dave Rase 2-  Glenn Sutt 3-   Richard Downs

Non Powder Horn competition Dave Rase , Glenn Sutt, Richard Downs

Non Powder Horn competition
Dave Rase , Glenn Sutt, Richard Downs

People Choice  1-   Glenn Sutt

Glenn Sutt and People's Choice Award

Glenn Sutt and People’s Choice Award

People's Choice Award for best Horn item

People’s Choice Award for best Horn item

On Sunday, there were  three more classes: one by Scott Morrison who talked about installing leather ends on woven horn straps, Steve Vance discussed horn coloration and Jim Hayden talked on books available on horn work.

I will post another article on the Raffle and the Auction.  More pictures coming.

The Capitol City Rifle and Pistol Club is a good venue for this event.  The West Coast Horn Fair for 2014 will be held there next May. We will build on the success of this event with better classes, demonstrations, hands on mentoring and another outstanding raffle.

Scott and Cathy Sibley Featured Artists

May 29, 2013

Scott and Cathy are featured on the Contemporary Makers Blog by Art and Jan Riser.

They were also featured on my email and on my website.

Scott Sibley at his ranch

Scott Sibley at his ranch

Scott writes for the website Kentucky Longrifles:

I had a great interest in History as a youngster. Living on a dairy farm there was the occasional de-horning of cows and bulls. This gave me a few small horns in with to make BB horns and Pellet horns. I carved myself a flintlock rifle out of a pine board and spent many hours entertaining myself with that and a horn to go with it.

Cathy Sibley

Cathy Sibley

In 1969 I met Cathy, we graduated from high school.  In 1971 we married and I joined the service. While in the service I got my hands on a Green River Rifle Works Leman kit. I assembled it and I needed a horn. A trip to a slaughter house in Boise Idaho provided me with several. I made the horn and one day was scratching on it when Cathy said, “that looks like fun” I handed her a horn and said “sand it down and try it” From that day on my partner became my horn engraver. We fooled and fiddled with a few horns and in 1976. We discovered Rendezvous  We went to one and were told “You kids should make those things and sell them” We were on our way.

Early 1998  horn by Scott and Kathy Sibley

Early 1998 horn by Scott and Kathy Sibley

Horns and scrimshawed Jewelry, as well as my hunting skills, put food on the table and helped pay the bills during my 5 years of college. Upon graduation I had a job in a long away, remote Eskimo village on the west coast of Alaska. My partner and I prepared for our departure to the Last frontier. In our “stuff”, there was my limited supply of tools and a box of horns.

Scott Sibley at his work table

Scott Sibley at his work table in Wyoming

“Strange things are done in the Midnight sun” Cathy and I wanted no part of that and so we stayed at home. I worked on horns and Cathy decorated them for me. We sent completed horns to a friend in Kentucky who was heavily involved in muzzleloading and he found new homes for them.

Kathy Sibley at her work table

Kathy Sibley at her work table in Wyoming

Life in an Eskimo village was unlike anything either of us had experienced. It brought us face to face into the pages of “National Geographics LIVE” We adapted and thrived. Living in our semi truck trailer stacked on 55 gallon oil barrels we made horns, carved fossilized Ivory and I found a new hobby, Selling furs to the Eskimos. I became “The White Whale fur man” “Ithpuk Gusiak”  While walking down the frozen tundra one day I had a revelation, Here in 1979, I was living as close as I could to the 18th century without leaving the country for Asia or Africa.. After that living there, surviving and prospering became a badge of honor for both of us.

Nathan Perry (ancestor) and his discharge papers. Auctioned at the CLA Show 2012

Nathan Perry (ancestor) and his discharge papers. Auctioned at the CLA Show 2012

We stayed for 10 years, leaving in the summers to briefly attend a rendezvous along the way to visit our families in Michigan. All this time our interested in history never ceased and I got into genealogy  I discovered my Great Grand father had been at Gettysburg on Little Round Top and was wounded. I found his Grand Father, Nathan Perry, had served for 8 years in the Continental Army. I found that just under 100 Sibley men had fought for freedom and Liberty during the American Revolution. My horn making took on new dimensions and a new meaning to me. With every one I was making a “tribute” to those who served. To me ,being a DAV, this is especially meaningful.

Wyoming sunset

Wyoming sunset

After the Civil War, my great grandfather didn’t go home, he sat off on a journey of the American West that went on till he died in 1915. His son and his ex wife had went on their separate ways several years earlier. “The old Captain was a hard and bitter man” My Great Grand Mother died, and then my grandfather died in 1917. The only 2 boys to be heirs to this history became step children with no idea of their real family name. I am glad to have dug it up and in finding my Grand fathers grave in central Wyoming I myself have found a home.

I look at my horn making and can rationalize that I am involved in it for a reason.

For the 2013 West Coast Horn Fair, Scott donated an “antiqued” Southern Banded Horn.

Southern Banded Horn by Scott Sibley

Southern Banded Horn by Scott Sibley

Scott and Cathy are the authors of two Best Sellers. The were one of the first to publish a book on building powder horns. Their second book is Building The Southern Banded Horn.

Building the Southern Banded Horn

Building the Southern Banded Horn

Recreating the 18th Century Powder Horn

Recreating the 18th Century Powder Horn

Sow’s Ear to be Auctioned at the 2013 WCHF in Washington

March 27, 2013

It all started at the West Coast Horn Fair last year in Morro Bay, California, Scott Morrison was given the challenge of starting with a bad cow horn (Sow’s Ear) and turning it into a “Silk Purse”.

Finished Banded Horn by Scott Morrison

Finished Banded Horn by Scott Morrison

John (Bigsmoke) Shorb gave a talk on “choosing your horn”. He had several examples of horns with defects that would lend a person to pass when choosing. One example that he recommended passing up was a thin, translucent, misshapened horn that had a severe delamination at the tip.

Scott Morrison recalls, “I was sitting in the back of the room with Steve Skillman in “Heckler’s” row and I just couldn’t let this go by. I told John something to the effect that this was nonsense and that there was a lot that one cold do with the horn. John came right back and said that when the horn came to me (it was being passed around the room) to go ahead and keep it. The gauntlet had been taken off and the challenge issued;  John was pretty much telling me to put up or shut up.”

“Well now honor was at stake and I could not back down. So I took up the challenge and not only would I take this “Sow’s Ear” and make some sort of “Silk Purse” with it, but it would come back to the West Coast Horn Fair in 2013 to be  auctioned off.”

“The horn sat in my to do box until recently when I decided that I needed to “get-r-done”. When I got back from the WCHF last year, all I had done with it was to cut off the tip and drill the spout. I had originally thought that the horn would be good for a Southern banded horn with an applied tip and when I cut and drilled it, I saw that there was plenty of material for such a horn.”

The de-lamination in this tip was sanded off.

The de-lamination in this tip was sanded off.

“As you can see in the photo, there is approximately 1/2 inch at the tip, which would be plenty for an applied tip or even threaded for a screw tip. The discoloration at the tip is where the internal separation of the horn layers occurred. I decided on a horn with an applied antler tip.”

“I had turned a base plug and fitted a rear ring to the horn and when I did a trial fit of an antler tip the horn looked too long to my eye. I ended up taking about 3/4 inch more off of the tip which improved the proportion. There was still plenty of material at the tip so I had no problem fitting the antler.”

Applied Tip made from antler repair the defective tip.

Applied Tip made from antler repair the defective tip. 

“Of greater concern to me wasn’t the tip but the thinness of the horn. When the horn was cleaned and polished, there was left humps and hollows from the sander that was used. One side of the horn was also pretty flat. Normally, there is enough wall thickness on a horn that I can work it to some semblance of round. However, since this horn was to thin, I was afraid that if I tried to round it I might break through the wall. The best I could hope for was to remove the humps and hollows and have a smooth body. The flat spot would have to remain.”

Scott Morrison Horn before staining.

Scott Morrison Horn before staining.

“I first thought of having just one band on the horn, but decided that this would be too uninteresting so I went with three bands. I heated the bands so they were pliable and they slipped around the oblong shape of the body easily, leaving no gaps. The base plug is walnut. The button finial is turned horn and tapered to slip fit into the base.”

Banded horn By Scott Morrison

Banded horn By Scott Morrison

Two of the Three bands

Two of the Three bands. Scott says the flat spot is in the picture.

“I heated the bands so they were pliable and they slipped around the oblong shape of the body easily, leaving no gaps.”

Base Plug with WCHF for West Coast Horn Fair.

Base Plug with WCHF for West Coast Horn Fair.

“The base plug is walnut. The button finial is turned horn and tapered to slip fit into the base.”

Stained with aqua fortis, then added a patina

Stained with aqua fortis, then added a patina

“The horn was stained with aqua fortis, then a patina applied with a combination of shoe polish and black powdered tempura paint.”

The horn is translucent and light as a feather.

The horn is translucent and light as a feather.

“It measures 15 inches along the outside curve and 2 1/4 inches across at the base. The horn is nice and translucent and light as a feather.”

“I think it is an acceptable “Silk Purse” made from the “Sow’s Ear” that was the original horn.”

“Hawkeye” Horn Strap and Osceola’s Garters

March 14, 2013

This is a picture of the blue and white belt worn by Daniel Day Lewis. It was used as a horn belt in the movie “Last of the Mohicans”. It is  also known at the “Hawkeye Belt”

Hawkeye from the Movie, "The Last of the Mohicans"

Hawkeye from the Movie, “The Last of the Mohicans”

This replica of the above Horn strap was made by Gary Bertelson, gbertels@insight.rr.com and donated to 2013 The West Coast Horn Fair for a raffle prize.

IMG_5213

This donation  is made with from replica wampum beads, woven on brain tanned deer hide laces with artificial sinew.  It is long!  The beaded portion measures  50 inches plus 15 inches of lace fringe on each end. You can reach gary at:  gbertels@insight.rr.com

Gary also sent  a set of  “Osceola” beaded garters.   These are based on the original piece at the National Museum of the American Indian
which says they are associated with Osceola and included in a George
Catlin painting.  They are beaded in wool yarn.

Replica Beaded Garters associated with Osceola, Seminole. Donated for the WCHF Raffle

Replica Beaded Garters associated with Osceola, Seminole. Donated for the WCHF Raffle

This is the picture of the originals from the website of  The National Museum of the American Indian.

Original Garters associated with Osceola (Seminole, 1803–1838)

Original Garters associated with Osceola (Seminole, 1803–1838)

The National Museum of the American Indian states this about the garters in their museum:

“These leg garters likely belonged to the Seminole leader Osceola. Born in 1804 to Polly Coppinger, a part Muscogee Creek woman, Osceola was the most famous of several Seminole leaders who rose to prominence during the Second Seminole War, from 1835 to 1842. Osceola, whose name means Black Drink Singer, was also strong in medicine and was known for his ability to consume the black drink made from yaupon holly.

Seminole leader Osceola Portrait by George Catlin 1838.

Seminole leader Osceola Portrait by George Catlin 1838.

“Osceola enjoyed the stature and recognition that he had earned. George Catlin produced two paintings of Osceola. In each of them the war leader wears clothes of Seminole tradition. These finger-woven wool garters, which have beads woven into the pattern, are very similar to the garters Osceola wore in Catlin’s full-length portrait, painted in 1838, shortly before the Seminole leader’s death while he was imprisoned at Fort Moultrie, South Carolina.

Source:  The National Museum of the American Indian.

West Coast Horn Fair 2013 Raffle Prizes

March 12, 2013

The West Coast Horn fair will be held in Littlerock WA April 26, 27 and 28 2013. The event is funded entirely by raffle tickets.  Horn makers from all over the US have donated prizes for this raffle.

You do not need to be present to win. We mail the prizes to you at no cost to you. For a complete list of all the prizes and a link to buy tickets click HERE

Southern Banded Horn by Scott Sibley

Southern Banded Horn by Scott Sibley

This Southern Banded Powder Horn was donated by Scott Sibley.  The horn measures 13″ around the double curve.  Scott filed the horn to make it much lighter in weight. The tip is turned Whitetail antler and it done in two pieces as were the majority of original horns. The tip and bands are fastened with wooden pegs.

Applied Tip on Sibley's Horn

Applied Tip on Sibley’s Horn

There are four turned bands. The base plug is cherry, turned with a “wasp waist” design as per an original “Shenandoah Valley” horn that is in Scott’s collection.  The dark color is also like the original horn.

Wampum beaded Belt “Hawkeye Belt”donated by Gary Bertelsen

Wampum belt patterned after the movie The Last of the Mohicans. By Gary Bertelsen

Wampum belt patterned after the movie The Last of the Mohicans. By Gary Bertelsen

This is designed after the belt Daniel Day Lewis used as a horn belt in the
movie “Last of the Mohicans” also known at the “Hawkeye Belt”

It is made with replica wampum beads, woven on brain tanned deer hide
laces with artificial sinew.

Measures (beaded portion) 50 inches plus 15 inches of lace fringe on each
end – At 50 inches, this is a strap that will fit a Big Boy. gbertels@insight.rr.com

“Osceola” beaded garters.

Second prize by Gary Bertelsen (no picture yet)I included a set of “Osceola” beaded garters.   These are based on the original piece at the National Museum of the American Indian which says they were actually worn by Osceola and included in a George Catlin painting. gbertels@insight.rr.com

Horn Box donated by Tim Sanner

Horn Box donated by Tim Sanner

Horn Box donated by Tim Sanner

Tim Sanner is a Journeyman Horner in the Honourable Company of Horners.  This little container is called a Horn Box. The box is made of cow horn with a walnut base.  The lid is turned walnut with a white horn ring.  It measures 3 1/2″ tall and 2 1/2″ in diameter. This is a piece anyone would be proud to own.

13 WCHF Yosef

Artist Proof on cow horn by Yosef Trilling

13 WCHF Yosef (640x480)

Artist Proof on cow horn by Yosef Trilling

Two artist’s proof horns engraved by Yosef Trilling. He takes a cow horn and engraves a new subject to see exactly how it will look on the curved and limited surface of the horn. Yosef can be found on eBay and the CLA site. Also atrilling@kc.rr.com.

Engraving tool made and donated by David Rase.

Engraving tool made and donanted by David Rase.

Engraving tool made and donated by David Rase.

Engraving Tool by David Rase

This tool can be used to do some fine engraving on a powder horn. The tip is a Coulter Precision carbide point held in place with a set screw so the tip can be changed out when it gets dull.  Dave hand turned the brass holder and installed a blue grip cushion.  You can reach David  at davidrase@q.com

THE HARTLEY HORN DRAWINGS

This hard back book was donated by Jeff Bibb at The Honourable Company of Horners.

Robert M. Hartley made these drawings documenting historic powder horns. The  drawings are laid out so you see all sides of the horn. There are close-up photos of  the Royal Coat of Arms, rivers, cities and towns, forts and animals.

The Hartley Horn Drawings donated by The Honourable Company of Horners

The Hartley Horn Drawings donated by The Honourable Company of Horners

Detail from the pages of The Hartley Book
Detail from the pages of The Hartley Book

Detail from the pages of The Hartley Book

Detail from the pages of The Hartley Book

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